Inspiring Childhood Delivers Inspiring Jewellery in Leeds Show…

As nationally celebrated Craft & Design Month enters into its second week The Craft Centre and Design Gallery in Leeds are a reminder of how much talent there is right on our doorstep; celebrating the very best of British Craft in their exciting seasonal exhibition programme over the last 34 years.  Anyone visiting the Craft Centre over the coming months can expect to see contemporary jewellery and sculpture created from recycled objects in their inspiring show called Another Life until the end of June, as well as an exhibition of etchings by Mary Gillett and Tessa Asquith-Lamb, an annual showcase of rings and their new exhibition celebrating a trio of emerging makers making their mark in the world of ceramics in a show called Beneath the Surface. Despite the Art Gallery’s closure at the beginning of this year, The Craft Centre (tucked away underneath the Art Gallery) has proven a popular substitute for a daily dose of inspiration in Leeds with visitors enjoying the works on display. Visitors can learn all about the inspirations behind the works on display by reading the literature about each maker in the gallery, a wonderful way to gain an appreciation for these talented individuals.

Sally Ayling showcases her jewellery as part of the show Another Life, where new life is breathed into once discarded objects and created into wonderfully inspiring pieces of contemporary craft pieces; she is pictured above in her studio and with some of her work pictured on the right.  Sally has been making jewellery since 1996 and has a wide knowledge of materials; silver, wood, acrylic, reclaimed metals from tins, found objects, fabric and other collected items. “I grew up surrounded by fantastically beautiful objects and raw materials as my mum was, and still is, a textile and print designer. I vividly remember the two weeks I spent off school with the mumps at the age of 9, when my mum decided she would teach me the fundamentals of drawing rather than catching up on the various maths, and English work that I was missing. For one exercise she put a magnolia branch in a vase and we would do studies of it every day as its structure changed and it gradually came into bloom and then wilted. From then on I had an avid interest in the intricacies of natural objects. This awe of nature, coupled with a contrary fascination with the engineering and manufacturing techniques that I have learnt on the practical courses I have since done, influences what I produce greatly. I couldn’t be happier than with a window in front of me, a sketchbook beside me, and some materials to work with on my grandfather’s old jewellery bench.”

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